Power Generation

Renewable energies are becoming a major part of the power generation mix. But these resources are depending highly on environmental factors. AEG Power Solutions helps customers to make the most of them by shifting the power generation to the most profitable times or aligning it with consumption peaks. Battery energy storage also keeps the production within the grid stability requirements.

SCHEDULED PRODUCTION

REDUCE OVERPRODUCTION AND SHIFT YOUR POWER PRODUCTION TO THE MOST PROFITABLE PERIODS!

The Energy Storage System is charged while the electrical supply system is powering minimal load and the cost of electric usage is reduced, such as at night. It is then discharged to provide additional power during periods of increased loading, while costs for using electricity are increased. It also effectively shifts the impact of the load on the system, minimizing the generation capacity required.

without BES
without BES
with BES
with BES
 

Peak Shaving

Peak shaving is similar to load leveling and can be employed to mitigate utility bills. The goal is to avoid the installation of capacity to supply the peaks of a highly variable load. Peak shaving installations are often owned by the electricity consumer, rather than by the utility. Utilities reduce the operational cost of generating power during peak periods - reducing the need for peaking load power plants. Investment in infrastructure is delayed due to the flatter loads with smaller peaks.

 

Peak Shifting

SHIFT PRODUCTION PEAKS TO CONSUMPTIONS PEAKS

Peak shifting is similar to scheduled production, but more for the purpose to align the power production with the load profile than for economic reasons. This kind of installation is beneficial in micro grids where production and demand have to align especially in power island applications. During peak production hours the energy will be stored in batteries which later will be discharged during peak demand hours.

without BES
without BES
with BES
with BES
 

Ramp Rate Control

Distributed grid-connected photovoltaics (PV) is playing an increasingly significant role as an electric supply resource and as an integral part of the electrical grid. However, PV poses some notable challenges to the grid such as rapid output variations (ramping), daily output variability, effects on power quality, especially voltage and current harmonics, current “backflow” and a mismatch between PV output and end-users’ peak demand. Grid-connected or on-site electricity storage that is located near where PV is deployed, provides means to offset or manage such challenges.